Add New Plants to Your Garden

Got gaps in borders or beds? Fill them with some recent introductions, rather than settling for tried and true. Here are some options from some well-known growers. Look for these plants in area specialty nurseries or shop online sources.

From Proven Winners (www.provenwinners.com)



Blackberry Punch
'Blackberry Punch' and ‘Coralberry Punch' Superbells - These new Calibrachoas are the series' fashionistas. ‘Blackberry Punch' flowers are a sophisticated deep purple edged in magenta, while ‘Coralberry Punch' blooms have throats of rich burgundy. Easy to grow, long flowering and ideal for baskets and containers.
'Golddust' Mercardonia - This petite hybrid to 5-inches tall is a strong garden performer, covered with cheery yellow flowers May to October. Heat tolerant and low maintenance - no deadheading needed. Carpets baskets or border edges with color.

From Monrovia (www.monrovia.com)

'Bountiful Blue' Blueberry - All season garden interest and sweet blueberries make this semi-dwarf shrub an ideal addition to edible landscapes. Foliage is strongly blue-tinged, turning red in fall; white flowers are followed by large berries. Performs best near a different variety blueberry bush. Grows 3 to 4 feet tall and wide.
'Heatwave' Salvias - This Salvia greggii series popular in Australia for its heat and drought tolerance is ideal for water wise gardens here. Compact plants to 2 feet tall bear blooms in shades of lavender, pink, rose and white. Hummingbird favorites.

From Mountain States Wholesale Nursery (www.mswn.com)

Chrysactinia mexicana - Low growing mats to 2-feet tall and wide of aromatic foliage are a backdrop for daisy-like flowers in a traffic-stopping intense yellow. Shear lightly for repeat bloom. Water deeply once a week. Heat tolerant.
Yucca pallida - Nursery rep Wendy Proud calls this succulent the "new agapanthus" for its dramatic four foot tall flower stalks that bear pure white bell-shaped flowers for two months starting in spring. Blue-green leaves are edged in yellow-pink; sharp tips can be clipped off. "Not your grandmother's yucca," Proud adds.

 

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